A Fly on the Wall

Reporting can be very difficult at times, but you have to push through- you’re story depends on it.  Ann Hull in Telling True Stories gives great insight on how to be a great reporter.

1.  Observe.  Be the fly.  Sit in the top corner of a room and just watch.  Be that hidden camera in a teddy bear.  Just watch everything and remember every detail.

2.  Live as they do.  Now is when you leave your corner, or the inside of the Teddy Bear, and mimic everything your subject does.  This is how you learn the details and catch things you might have missed.  This is when you experience your subject’s life and truly understand who they are.

3.  Minimize your presence.  It’s probably going to obvious you’re outsider- try not to draw attention to yourself.

4.  Remember, you are not one of them.  Don’t get too caught up in the moment.  Remember your place and respect your subject. Keep your distance and remember, you’re the fly, not the subject.

5.  Check out your subject.  Look for anything you can find.  You want to legitimize your subject so you need proof.  Paper trails and the Internet are great places to begin.

6.  Keep a friend around.  Sometimes writing can get lonely and depressing if your story isn’t going well.  Keep someone around who can cheer you up and renew your spirits.

7.  Think about each word.  I have a bad habit of writing something and never rereading it.  Don’t get this habit reread everything.  Ask yourself, “what about this word?”  “Is there a better word?”  and always look at synonyms.

8.  Learn about the community.  Reading the local newspaper is a great start.  Another great thing is going to a local church.  Also, the coffee shop is a great place to learn about the community- it’s also a great place to be a fly on the wall.  You get a feel for the atmosphere in the community and it really helps you understand your subject more.

9.  Use their language.  If you want to get a story, you have to connect with your subject.  In order to connect, you have to be on the same level.  If you’re in the south- say “y’all” instead of “you guys.”  Simple things like this can really help you connect with that person and build a relationship.

10.  Be as open as possible.  Reporting and interviewing is all about building relationships with your subject.  You can’t build a relationship if you’re mute and have your head in your notebook the whole time.  You have to be engaged and share a part of yourself with your subject.

Good luck with reporting, and if there is anything I can help with feel free to ask!

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5 thoughts on “A Fly on the Wall

  1. Hi 🙂

    I really enjoyed this piece. I shared it with my boss too and we thought it was great to share in our feature Friday. It’s something we host on our blog to shared articles we’ve enjoyed with others. We direct them right to your site and piece to read it.

    Thanks for sharing this post,
    Here’s the link to our site: http://aecstellar.com/

    Cheers 😀

    • Awesome! Thank you so much! 🙂

      I’m so happy you enjoyed this and I look forward to reading more from the Author Extension Community!

      Have a great day! Aloha! 🙂

      • You’re welcome 😀

        We hope you enjoy your visit on our site 🙂 It’s dedicated to the writing community – something I love so much.

        Here’s the link to the post: http://wp.me/p4dymg-9r

        If anything needs to be changed, just let me know 🙂
        Have a wonderful weekend! 🙂
        Cheers!

  2. Pingback: The Author Extension Community » A Fly on the Wall – Southern Miss Features

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